Monday, September 16, 2013

Circle Snowmen, Part One


You will need:
A surface (of course)
I find that it is easier to do a wet on wet blending technique on canvas.
Anything with a "tooth" will work though
and
canvas suitcases are a great surface to work on. 
Wet on wet blending on smooth surfaces gets a little trickier
so when you are starting or practicing
this technique, look for something that will make it easier.
 
Those inexpensive canvas boards are a good way to start.
Now back to what you will need:
Circle Template (or two)
Pencil, of course
Chalk pen or chalk (not pictured)
Paint
and
Brushes.
 
Ok, so I am pretty loose where it comes to paint colors.
Look for ones that blend together nicely
and
experiment.
I have done these in browns also.
Light Cinnamon,
Bleached Sand...
White.
 
Brushes.
I really like a filbert for these.
It is already rounded and doesn't make hard edges in your blending
as a flat would.
That being said,
I have painted a lot of these with flats,
so don't feel that you have to run out and buy a filbert.
 
I use Loew Cornell brushes, mostly.
Good brushes can be the key to getting good results!
 
 

And so,
Sketch in with the chalk pencil or chalk where you think you want your circles.

Then, with the pencil or circle template
actually draw them in.  

Base all the circles in with a medium blue.
You don't want this to blend in with the background,
but you don't want it so light that you don't have anywhere to go with highlights.
Begin then with the base color and re-basecoat the circle,
while this is wet,
pick up the tiniest bit of the darker blue
and shade the left side and bottom of the circle. 

Now,
here is the most important tip of wet on wet painting....
Wait for it...
Make sure that you hear it....
Do not..
DO NOT!
DIP YOUR BRUSH IN WATER!
 
Did you all get that? 
Do I need to repeat it?
Because I have taught classes and people
and
have said that loudly and no sooner said it
than I heard the swish, swish, swish in the water!
 
Honestly.
 
It makes me want to dump that water right over their cute little painting heads.
 
Sorry!
 
Wipe your brush,
blot your brush,
squeeze your brush between two paper towels,
then pick up some of the medium blue and some of the beigy white
and
lightly start to lay that in on the upper right side of the circle.
 


Lay it in the middle and lightly blend around the edges of it. 

And don't forget to add a little reflected light on the left
ever so lightly.
This really helps to make your ball look round
and a little frosty. 

 
Add another highlight of white, a little smaller
and blend the same way. 
This is what your palette should look like.
This technique does not take much paint.

And there is the first snowman done.
The key of this is to not overblend. 
They are choppy looking. 
Snowmen
and
snowwomen
are not smooth anyway.
The have some cellulite issues.
 
I find it is easier to do several circles at once,
it gives them a little time to tack up for the drybrushing.
 
To Be continued...
 
Hope this helps all of you,
don't hesitate to ask for directions
or help.
 
Oh, and one last thing.
Share this, pin this, use it,
paint for yourself or for profit,
just don't share the directions as your own...
please! 
 


7 comments:

Karen said...

Oh if I could paint I would try this...painting has always fascinated me but it's something I'm not any good at.
I like what I see so far and your tutorial is great for those that understand and want to do it.
Karen

Sandi @ The Primitive Skate said...

Thank You for sharing your tutorial, Cathy!
Love your work, and I Love Snowmen.
Thanks for all the tips.
Can't wait for part 2.

Sandi

Ann said...

you make this sound so easy and yet when you put a paintbrush in my hand I create the work of a kindergartner :) Of course I also am extremely cheap and buying "good" brushes is almost as difficult for me as doing the actual painting. I do want to try this though

Crafts By Jodi said...

Thank you Cathy! I love your tutorials! I would probably be one of those water dippers!!! Lol. Thanks for the tip!!

Crafts By Jodi said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Raggedy Creations said...

filbert????. is that anything like a cookie??? sorry I'm being silly but I never have heard a paint brush called a filbert.

great tut. waiting for part 2

charlotte fletcher@roma land woodcrafts said...

I did it...I did it...I DID IT...I don't think I did too bad either! I learned some things and can't wait to try it again! I laughed every time I would mash some of the paint out of my brush to keep it from getting muddy!! Don't get it wet... LOL... I shared it on my page and blog today AND I'm giving away the picture I did...Thank you SO much for sharing this with all of us!! I can't wait to do more!